The Best Ways To Get Rid of Drywood Termites

1. Identification

Drywood termites are difficult to treat and identify because they are sneaky.

They live and nest inside the wood.

Drywood termites also create multiple scattered colonies inside the wood.

When identifying Drywood termite infestation, it’s vital to be as thorough as possible.

How to Detect Drywood termite?

Unfortunately, there are no standard devices that make it easy to detect termites.

The most common way to inspect for drywood termites is to look for visual signs.

To do this, you can use a metal probe or screwdriver to probe wood for termite galleries.

You can also go around your house and look for the following evidence:

  • Discarded termite wings
  • Drywood droppings (pellets)
  • Damaged wood
  • Kickout holes
  • Uneven or Bubbling Paint
  • Flying termites in your home

Other than visual clues, you can also listen for evidence of termites.

Termites are noisy eaters. Sometimes you’ll be able to hear them eating if you place your ear against your walls.

You can also tap the wood with your knuckles or a tapping tool and listen for hollow sounds.

Termites devour wood from the inside out, leaving a weak shell.

As such, when you knock on an area that has termite damage, it will sound hollow.

2. Implement Whole Structure or Localized Treatment

There are two types of treatment you can take for termite infestation: Whole Structure and Localized treatment.

Whole Structure treatments are best for houses with larger infestations.

It implements the simultaneous treatment of all infestation in a structure.

Localized or spot treatment is more restrictive.

It’s applied to targeted areas and is best for smaller infestations.

Localized Treatment

Localized or spot treatment is applied to targeted areas.

The idea is to identify where the colony is located correctly.

Once located, the treatment is applied directly onto the termites.

For this treatment to be effective, you’ll need to detect precisely where the termites are.

As such, this type of treatment typically works best for smaller infestations.

Here are four types of localized treatments that are proven to be effective:

1. Wood Replacement

As the name suggests, wood replacement involves replacing the infested wood.

Wood replacement is ideal if the infestation is only on a few pieces of wood.

If so, you can remove and replace the wood to get rid of the drywood termites in your home.

After replacing the wood, I recommend you treat the new wood to prevent the termites from coming back.

You can do this by applying a layer of termiticide or bora-care to all sides of the area of the new wood.

Keep in mind, if the infested wood is load-bearing, you must consult with a professional first.

If you are unable to replace the wood, then applying other localized treatment might be better for you.

2. Localized Dust / Foam Treatment

Localized Dust or Foam Treatment involves injecting pesticides into the infested wood.

These pesticides can come in the form of liquid, dust, or foam formulations.

Using dust is more effective than foam unless there’s moisture in the wood.

Moisture can render dust ineffective. As such, I recommend using dust pesticides only on dry wood.

If you suspect that the wood inside has moisture, you’re better off with foam.

Foam is also a better option for larger wall voids.

To apply either dust or foam treatment, drill into the wood until you feel less resistance.

This hollow area is where the termite gallery is.

Drill holes every 6-12 inches across the entire wood.

You’ll then use these holes to inject the termite galleries with pesticides.

Reapply treatment every three months for the best results.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBbuqon3TIo&feature=emb_title

3. Liquid Nitrogen – Cold Treatment

Cold treatment involves injecting liquid nitrogen into infested areas. 

This treatment has been proven capable of killing termites at a 100% mortality rate.

That’s because temperatures below 25 degrees are fatal to termites.

And liquid nitrogen can reach temperatures as low as -320 degrees.

The downside of this method is that it tends to be expensive.

While this approach is free of toxic chemicals, liquid nitrogen can be dangerous if not handled with care.

As such, you’ll likely need professional help, which can be costly.

Also, not all pest control services offer a liquid nitrogen treatment for termites.

4. Heat – Localized Thermal Treatment

Localized heat treatment has been shown to eliminate 98% of termites in the infested areas.

It involves heating infested wood above 120°F, which is fatal to termites.

Heat treatment is an excellent option if you’re looking to treat your home without using chemicals.

Similar to cold treatment, heat treatments require hiring professionals, which can be expensive.

But, unlike liquid nitrogen, heat treatment is offered by most pest control companies.

Whole Structure

Whole Structure treatment requires that you hire a professional pest control agency.

This method is best if you suspect you have a significant infestation.

Fumigation

Fumigation is the process of releasing a fumigant in your home to kill termites.

To do this, professionals must first place a tent over your home.

Then, they will activate the gas.

Once the termite inhales the fumigant, it will deplete their oxygen and kill them.

To avoid any toxic residue on your home, you must allow for proper dissipation time.

Dissipation time gives your house enough time to air out the gas.

Depending on the house, fumigation and dissipation time can take between 24 and 72 hours.

Fumigation is an excellent solution for termite infestation.

Studies show that it can eliminate 97% of termites after application.

Heat

Heat treatment uses propane heaters to raise temperature to levels that are deadly to termites.

It’s one of the most effective ways to eradicate termite infestation.

The California Department of Consumer Affairs has even gone on to say that heat is the only sufficient, full-structure treatment for eliminating termite.

And in this study, the heat method was also proven to kill 99% of termites consistently.

It killed termites in all parts of the home, including the attic, basement, drywall, and walls.

Heat treatment is an excellent option if you’re looking to treat your home without using chemicals.

While it can be expensive, the heat method is effective, fast, and safe.

3. Seal entry points

Once you have treated the infested areas, the next step is to apply a barrier treatment to keep drywood termites out.

The first step is to seal the entry points from outside your home.

Check for any dry, rotting, broken wood.

This type of wood will attract termites and make it easier for them to start infesting your home. 

Replace these before they can be infested with termites.

Termites can crawl into your home through the smallest cracks and crevices. So make sure to fill them with caulk to prevent termites from entering.

Sealing will also prevent any moisture from getting into your home.

You can also apply a fresh coat of paint to small crevices in the wood.

4. Protect Exposed Wood

If you have any wood that’s not painted or varnished, spray them with insecticide.

For this, I recommend using Bora-Care.

Boracare is excellent because it gets absorbed by the wood when applied.

As such, it will stay on the wood for its lifetime.

To use BORA-CARE, dilute five gallons of water for every one gallon BORA-CARE.

Next, transfer the solution to a pressurized spray bottle and spray it to any exposed wood.

Exposed wood is wood that does not have any liquid coating or paint over it.

Some familiar places indoors where you can find exposed wood are attics and basements.

You can also find them outdoors. These will typically be around your foundation, porches, deck, roof, shingles, or siding.

It is important to note that bora-care is only effective on exposed wood.

That’s because the chemical can not penetrate the painted or coated wood.

When using Bora-care, always wear safety equipment, including gloves, masks, long clothing, and goggles.

5. Soil Treatment

Another way you can prevent termites from entering your home is by creating a barrier.

To do this, make a trench 6 inches by 6inches wide around the foundation of your home.

Be careful with any pipes or sprinkler lines.

Next, pour liquid insecticide or termiticide into the trench.

Once the soil absorbs the liquid, it will act as a barrier to prevent any termites from entering your home.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTgg92HV84k

6. Bait Prevention

If you prefer not to pour chemicals into your soil, this method may work better for you.

Bait prevention involves placing a toxic bait into the ground around the entire perimeter of your home.

The idea is to get the termites to ingest and share the bait with their colony.

The termites will then gradually die in the process.

The delayed death is necessary because it prevents termites from noticing the deaths and avoiding the bait.

To increase the odds of termites ingesting your bait, I recommend placing the bait 10 to 15 feet apart.

Place the bait around the perimeter of your home.

You’ll also want to place some near previous termite damage.

One disadvantage of bait is that they work much slower than liquid insecticides.

It may take several weeks before the termites find the baits. And even longer for them to transfer it to the rest of the colony.

In that process, some degree of damage may occur.

That said, bait prevention can be useful in cases where liquid insecticide is out of the question.

For instance, if you live near ponds, streams, and drainage systems, using liquid treatment may not be an option.

7. Implement Other Prevention Methods

Keep Mulch Away

Keep Mulch Away at least 15 inches from your foundation.

 

Properly Store your Firewood

Termites thrive on firewood, so make sure to keep them at least 20 feet from your home.

It’s also a good idea to keep firewood a few inches off the ground.

 

Bug Screens

Also, another easy fix is to install bug screens over attic vents to prevent entry.

 

Ventilate Properly

Ventilate your home to prevent them from becoming too humid.

Termites need a water source to survive. And they flourish in damp and moist areas.

Apply ventilation fans in your attic, basement, and crawl space.

8. Monitor

Inspect your home for any signs of an infestation after your treatment.

Look for termite droppings or pellets, kick-out holes, and wood damage.

If you continue to see signs 3-6 months after your treatment, you may have a significant termite infestation.

If so, I recommend contacting your professional pest control companies for help.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

How dangerous are drywood termites?

Drywood termites are one of the most destructive termites species in the U.S.

These pests live and nest inside the wood.

They are sneaky and can infest your home without being noticed.

Drywood termites create multiple scattered colonies inside the wood, making them difficult to locate.

How do you get rid of drywood termites yourself?

You should only try to get rid of drywood termites yourself if you have a minor infestation.

Large infestations require professional help.

Here are two methods you can take to eliminate termites yourself.

 

Wood Replacement

Wood replacement involves replacing the infested wood.

Wood replacement is ideal if the infestation is only on a few pieces of wood that’s easy to access.

After replacing the wood, treat the new wood bora-care to prevent termites from coming back.

 

Localized Dust / Foam Treatment

Localized Dust or Foam Treatment involves injecting pesticides into the infested wood.

These pesticides can come in the form of liquid, dust, or foam formulations.

How do you find drywood termites?

The most common way to find drywood termites is to look for visual signs.

To do this, you can use a screwdriver to probe wood for termite galleries.

You can also go around your house and look for:

  • Discarded termite wings
  • Drywood droppings a.k.a pellets
  • Damaged wood
  • Kickout holes
  • Uneven or Bubbling Paint
  • Flying termites in your home

Other than visual clues, you can also listen for evidence of termites.

Termites are noisy eaters. Sometimes you’ll be able to hear them eating if you place your ear against your walls.

You can also tap the wood using a tapping tool to listen for hollow sounds.

Termites devour wood from the inside out, leaving a weak shell.

As such, when you knock on an area that has termite damage, it will sound hollow.

What is the best treatment for drywood termites?

For massive infestations, fumigation or heat treatment is the best way to eliminate drywood termites.

For smaller infestations, localized treatment using an injectable insecticide works well.

You’ll also want to implement prevention, such as treating exposed wood with bora-care or termiticide.

How fast do drywood termites spread?

Drywood termites are one of the slowest of all termites species to spread.

Their colonies are small. They generally only consist of less than 500 termites.

That said, Drywood termites are one of the most destructive termites species in the U.S.

They infest different areas of a structure at once, making them difficult to detect and eliminate.

How to get rid of drywood termites without tenting?

The best way to get rid of termites without tenting is with localized treatment.

Localized treatment will allow you to target specific infested areas and eliminate them.

There are many types of localized treatment.

Some you can perform yourself or while others require professional help.

Keep in mind that localized treatment will only work for small infestations.

Larger termite infestations need to be handled by professionals.

How to get rid of drywood termites in furniture?

The best way to get drywood termites out of furniture is by using a spot treatment using dust or foam insecticide.

Since furniture is much smaller and more comfortable to inspect, this type of localized treatment is typically sufficient to eliminate termites.

To do this, locate where the termites are in the furniture.

You can do these by inspecting for damaged wood.

You can also tap the wood to find the hollow spots.

Once you’ve identified the infested area, drill into the wood until you feel less resistance.

This hollow area is where the termite gallery is.

Next, inject the dust or foam insecticide into the furniture to fill the galleries.

How to prevent drywood termites?

One of the most effective ways of preventing drywood termites from invading your home is to treat all exposed wood in your home with Bora-care.

Boracare is excellent because it gets absorbed by the wood when applied.

As such, it will stay on the wood for its lifetime.

It’s also a great idea to:

  • Keep Mulch Away at least 15 inches from your foundation.
  • Keep firewood at least 20 feet from your home. It’s also a good idea to keep firewood a few inches off the ground.
  • Install bug screens over attic vents to prevent entry.
  • Replace any rotting or damaged wood

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